Highland Colonial Bent Grass

“Highland” BentgrassA fine-leaved, cool-season sod-forming perennial. Forms a close, high quality turf. Adapted to cool, humid regions, but is fairly drought tolerant. Needs sun, will tolerate some shade. Persists on acid soils on which Kentucky Bluegrass will die out. Used primarily as a lawn grass west of the Cascade Range in Oregon, Washington, and in New England. Very competitive, will tend to dominate other desirable grasses. Tends to form thatch if not properly mowed and maintained. Moderate wearability.Seeding rate 1 1/2 to 3 lbs/1000 sq.ft.
Highland is a standby when it comes to colonial bentgrass. Not only does it perform well in home lawns, but it is used widely on golf courses, for both fairways and roughs. In areas across the U.S., Highland has survived under low maintenance conditions with reduced nitrogen and still has shown excellent turf quality and the ability to survive.
HIGH QUALITY
Highland is a very fine-textured colonial bentgrass which grows with an upright vertical pattern. Highland has a medium, dark green color which it retains well into the fall. It has excellent dollar spot resistance and improved brown patch resistance.
PERFORMANCE
Highland’s use on golf course fairways is pleasing to superintendents and golfers alike as well as home owners for exceptional lawns. Its upright growth pattern provides an excellent turf at the 3/8 to 1/2 inch height of cut demanded by many golfers, with less thatch buildup than other bentgrass varieties. It can also be utilized in roughs, where the low maintenance qualities of colonial bentgrass can shine. Colonial bentgrasses survive adversity and in many areas of the country are found in sites that have received no fertilization, irrigation, or management for many years. Well manicured home lawns can utilize Highland at cutting heights of 1/2 to 2 inches with out any problems.
ADAPTABILITY
Colonial bentgrasses have seen widespread growth with great success which suggest a wider area of adaptation rather than just the Pacific Northwest and New England states. Improved colonial bentgrasses such as highland have also performed well in areas from the southeast to the midwest and the mid-Atlantic. Due to their high turf quality, they are also being utilized in some mixtures for overseeding dormant warm season grasses.